How many times? Every fucking time.

Listening to Club Car Special as part of my usual bedtime playlist. Club Car was a radio teaser for the humor page of Hearst papers, dramatizing some of the columns and cartoons to enrich your reading experience. One of the regular humorists was O O McIntyre.

It struck me that Kirn’s short takes on Twitter are a close modern equivalent of McIntyre’s short takes in print. I tried to find more of McIntyre’s real columns, without luck. Though part of his work was before the Steamboat Willie copyright threshold, his actual work is absent online. There are several good articles about McIntyre, which reinforce the parallel. Both grew up in the Midwest (Wisconsin for Kirn, Ohio for McIntyre) and both came from eccentric families. Both moved to NYC and applied the eccentric Midwestern viewpoint to their writing about NYC and elites. Later: Kirn mentioned that he was born in Akron, so the Ohio connection is even firmer.

Come to think of it, most of Hearst’s writers were real Americans who made a point of writing TO real Americans while describing bizarre NYC aliens. George Ade was from Indiana, Damon Runyon from the other Manhattan, Will Rogers from Claremore. Runyon and Rogers turned alien, losing their American perspective, but Ade and McIntyre remained real.

While looking for McIntyre material, I ran into a much more interesting artifact, which provides a highly specific answer to the question mentioned in yesterday’s item. Srinivasan was assuming that total censorship is a new thing. Wildly wrong.

Cartoons magazine from 1918 shows how it was done. The trade journals passed along Holy Prophet Wilson’s holy orders to the nation’s writers and cartoonists.

Index pages from three months:

There was a specific theme for every country and every subject, with sample cartoons helpfully provided. As we achieved our unnecessary and pointless “victory” over Germany, the focus shifted to Russia, where we were already preparing our invasion forces. Japan was our dear democratic friend, and China was the Yellow Peril because our dear democratic friend Japan was invading and occupying China.

On Russia:

Since the coup that put Vladimir Lenine and Leon Trotzky in power was
brought about through the tragic blundering of Kerensky the world has been waiting for word that this precious pair of madmen had been deposed by the saner elements in Russia and that some sort of responsible government was on the way. For this we have so far waited in vain. If Russia has the power to save herself from complete dissolution and the fate of being destroyed by the combined forces of anarchy, treachery and German autocracy, it has yet to be made manifest.

Referring to the threat of Trotzky and Lenine to expose the “secret treaties” of the allies, the New York Tribune says: “Whether Trotzky and Lenine are in German pay or not, they are serving German ends deliberately, and all that they say and all that they do deserves to be treated as a detail in German propaganda.”

Our invasion of Russia was an extension of our war against Germany, because Russia was a German puppet. It didn’t matter that our invading army was working WITH the Axis forces from Czechoslovakia, and it didn’t matter that we were working WITH the Japs, who continued invading Russia after we gave up and faded out. It didn’t matter that we later worked WITH the Krauts directly to invade the Baltics.

Meanwhile, supporters of the ‘Red Terror’ at home were being cultivated and organized and arrested by Lady Edgar, developing a technique that her demonic agency continues to this day.

= = = = =

Irrelevant footnote: Since I grew up in Manhattan, I ought to know more about Runyan, including the correct spelling of his name. I can never decide if it’s Runyan or Runyon. Turns out both are correct. He was born in 1880 at 4th and Osage to Alfred and Sarah Runyan. Alfred founded the Mercury, which is now Manhattan’s only paper. Damon completed 4th grade, then the family moved to Pueblo. Damon took off to Denver and worked on various papers, specializing at first in sports. One of the papers misspelled his name on a byline, and he decided it looked better that way.