AI comprehends comprehension

I hadn’t looked at good old CookingFlavr.com in a while. Today it’s treading into my area of partial expertise, language and speech. Quoting the definitive and authoritative definition:

= = = = =

There is Plenty of Evidence to Support the Claim That Solely responsible for language comprehension is a False Claim.

First and foremost, there is overwhelming evidence to suggest that not all language comprehension is Solely the responsibility of the speaker. In fact, in many cases, the language user is actually very collaborative in their comprehension. For example, when you are trying to understand a sentence in a foreign language, you are likely to be working with other people in order to get a sense of the meaning. This type of collaborative comprehension is often referred to as cooperative language comprehension.

Second, there is also evidence to suggest that not all language comprehension is entirely the responsibility of the speaker. In fact, in many cases, the language user may be able to understand the language even if they do not speak it. For example, some people are able to understand a foreign language even if they do not know how to speak it. This is referred to as idiomatic language comprehension.

Third, there is also evidence to suggest that some language comprehension is not completely the responsibility of the speaker. In some cases, the speaker may be able to understand the language even if they do not speak it. For example, some people are able to understand a foreign language even if they do not know how to speak it. This is referred to as idiomatic language comprehension.

Finally, there is also evidence to suggest that some language comprehension is not entirely the responsibility of the speaker. In some cases, the speaker may be able to understand the language even if they do not speak it. For example, some people are able to understand a foreign language even if they do not know how to speak it. This is referred to as idiomatic language comprehension.

Taken together, these three types of comprehension make it very clear that not all language comprehension is the responsibility of the speaker. In fact, in many cases, the language user is actually very collaborative in their comprehension. This type of collaborative comprehension is often referred to as cooperative language comprehension.

Additionally, there is also evidence to suggest that not all language comprehension is entirely the responsibility of the speaker. In many cases, the language user may be able to understand the language even if they do not speak it. This is referred to as idiomatic language comprehension.

Lastly, there is also evidence to suggest that some language comprehension is not entirely the responsibility of the speaker. In some cases, the speaker may be able to understand the language.

= = = = =

Got it. Finally, got it. Additionally, got it. Together, those spell got it.

In fairness, the same page includes several sections about language in the brain that are strictly correct, not jumbled at all. These sections must have been copied directly from other websites without the usual AI mixing and mashing.